Work of the Week – “Caja #1” by Ralph Nelson

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Monday, July 10, 2017

Work of the Week — “Cafeteria Still Life” by Fred Becker

by Haley Clement Upon a glimpse, Fred Becker’s Cafeteria Still Life, complete with an arrangement of glassware on a pedestal, almost seems like a standard still life. When you look closer, however, you begin to notice little oddities, such as figures and mushrooms jammed inside of vessels. This sense of strange is continued by the… Click to read the rest of the blog post
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Sunday, July 2, 2017

Work of the Week — “Triangled Celebration” by Dorothy Gillespie

By Haley Clement Why not celebrate the declaration of America’s independence by examining a piece of art with the word “celebration” in its name? Dorothy Gillespie’s Triangled Celebration is equally as energetic as downtown Asheville will be this Tuesday night. With ribbons of color exploding in every which way just like the night’s fireworks, the… Click to read the rest of the blog post
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Monday, June 26, 2017

Work of the Week– “Merry Christmas All” by Henry Hammond Ahl

By Haley Clement Check your calendars, friends: Summer has officially started, which means we have begun the six-month countdown to the holidays. To celebrate, let us take a look at Henry Hammond Ahl’s Merry Christmas All. Even if you do not celebrate Christmas or care much for it, I think everyone can agree that this… Click to read the rest of the blog post
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Monday, June 19, 2017

Work of the Week– “Black Bear” by Minnie Adkins

By Haley Clement Being new to the area and its surreal landscape, I have developed an interest in the critters, both big and small, that inhabit it. Bears, which do not roam around in the yards of Tampa Bay residents, have become increasingly alluring since my move to Asheville. With this, I naturally was drawn… Click to read the rest of the blog post
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Monday, June 12, 2017

Work of the Week– “Formulation: Articulation Folio I, Folder 4” by Josef Albers

By Haley Clement Upon a shallow and, perhaps, artificial glance at Josef Albers’ 1972 serigraph Formulation: Articulation Folio I, Folder 4, one sees two multi-layer squares of color – one reminiscent of a cold, eerie room enveloping the viewer in its darkness and one of its burning, white-hot counterpart. Upon closer inspection, however, one can… Click to read the rest of the blog post