Discussion Bound

Second Tuesdays, 12:00 p.m.
Free
Meet at Malaprop’s Bookstore/Café (55 Haywood Street, Asheville 28801)

This monthly discussion is a place to exchange ideas about readings that relate to artworks and the art world, and to learn from and about each other. Pick up some tasty local fare at the Malaprop’s Café to make the most of your midday break! Books are available at Malaprop’s for a 10% discount.

If you would like to receive more information about Discussion Bound, please email Kristi McMillan, Adult Programs Manager, to add your name to our email list.

Visit the Discussion Bound page on the Malaprop’s website.


Summer 2018 Programs

JULY 10
The Madonnas of Leningrad: A Novel by Debra Dean

Bit by bit, the ravages of age are eroding Marina’s grip on the everyday. An elderly Russian woman now living in America, she cannot hold on to fresh memories — the details of her grown children’s lives, the approaching wedding of her grandchild — yet her distant past is miraculously preserved in her mind’s eye. Vivid images of her youth in war-torn Leningrad arise unbidden, carrying her back to the terrible fall of 1941, when she was a tour guide at the Hermitage Museum, and the German army’s approach signaled the beginning of what would be a long, torturous siege on the city. As the people braved starvation, bitter cold, and a relentless German onslaught, Marina joined other staff members in removing the museum’s priceless masterpieces for safekeeping, leaving the frames hanging empty on the walls to symbolize the artworks’ eventual return. As the Luftwaffe’s bombs pounded the proud, stricken city, Marina built a personal Hermitage in her mind — a refuge that would stay buried deep within her, until she needed it once more. Moderated by Doris Potash, Master Docent; with virtual guest Debra Dean, author.

 

AUGUST 14
Stolen

For the first time in 27 years, the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum has authorized a book on the daring theft of 13 priceless works of art worth over $500 million. The heist remains the largest unsolved theft in history; the museum’s $10 million reward for safe return of all the works still stands.

In 1903, Isabella Stewart Gardner opened her extraordinary museum, modeled after a Venetian palazzo, for the “enjoyment and education of the public forever.” She had amassed an impressive collection including some of the finest masterpieces by Rembrandt, Titian, Raphael, and Botticelli, as well as works by her contemporaries such as Sargent, Whistler, and Degas. In the early morning hours of March 18, 1990, two thieves disguised as police officers talked their way into the museum and tied up the night guards. They cut some of the paintings from their frames and stacked up others to take, leaving behind a priceless Rembrandt leaning against a chest. While it is believed that the thieves “came for the Rembrandts,” they also stole works by Vermeer, Degas, and Manet, among others. In 81 minutes, they were gone.

Stolen gives an inside look at the robbery and explores the impact of the missing works with commentary from the Museum’s director, curators, and the chief investigator. They describe how the theft, often called a crime against humanity, has affected visitors and disrupted Isabella Stewart Gardner’s careful arrangement of the works. The book is highly visual, with original photographs of the stolen objects, as well as how they originally looked in the galleries. Stolen, the only book on the theft commissioned by the Gardner Museum, provides the context to a brazen heist that left one of the world’s great museums in search of its lost masterpieces.