Art Inquiries

The curatorial team at the Asheville Art Museum works diligently to reply to inquiries. However, due to the large volume received, we may not be able to respond to all submissions. Please be aware that we are unable to receive unsolicited works of art on site. If artwork is mailed or dropped off, the Museum cannot be held responsible for the care of the work or the return of it to the sender.

Exhibition Proposals

Exhibition proposals are reviewed periodically throughout the year. Please send the following: 1) your contact information; 2) a checklist of the artworks in the proposed exhibition, including artist, title, date, medium, and dimensions for each artwork; 3) a brief description of the exhibition; 4) required square footage to display the exhibition; 5) when it is available; and 6) any associated fees. The Museum creates its exhibitions calendar several years in advance. If any further information is needed, a representative of the curatorial team will be in touch with you. Submissions with complete information as listed above will be prioritized. To inquire about exhibition proposals, please send an email to curatorialgeneral@ashevilleart.org or call 828.253.3227 x120.

Acquisition Proposals

The Collections Committee along with the curatorial team reviews potential acquisitions on a regular basis. If you have artwork you would like to present to the Museum for acquisition, please send via email an image along with the following: the artist, title, date, medium, dimensions, and history of ownership. The process of reviewing your offer may take several weeks, and we are not able to reply to every submission. To inquire about acquisition proposals, please send an email to curatorialgeneral@ashevilleart.org or call 828.253.3227 x120.

Appraisal Inquiries

Many Asheville Art Museum visitors inquire about appraisal services. Due to IRS regulations, the Museum cannot authenticate signatures, conduct appraisals, or place values on works of art. If you are in need of these services, you may want to try one of the following resources*:

Appraisers specialize in researching works of art and determining their value. They provide a written report that includes a detailed description of an object, information about the artist if known, and the object’s fair market value. There is a fee involved, but this appraisal can be used for insurance, trust, and tax purposes. To find an appraiser, try visiting one of the following websites. These sites have appraisers listed by specialty (paintings, prints, ceramics, etc.) and by geographic area:

Auction houses buy and sell works of art by offering them up for bid at public sales. They typically offer free consultations with an appraiser, with no obligation to sell your object. These consultations are verbal rather than written. Auction houses often offer free information about an object, including a general value range (i.e. auction estimate), if you contact them by email with a digital image and any information you might have about the object (material, artist, date, dimensions, condition, etc.). Some auction houses you may want to contact include:

  • Brunk Auctions in Asheville
  • Sotheby’s in New York City
  • Christie’s in New York City
  • Bonhams in New York City
  • Skinner Auctioneers and Appraisers in Boston
  • Also check auction houses in areas where an artist has resided/worked.

“Antiques Roadshow” is a PBS television series that tours the country and provides free appraisals of antiques and collectibles. Check their tour schedule at pbs.org/wgbh/roadshow to see if they will be visiting your area this year.

Appraisal events are offered by many local organizations and are similar to Antiques Roadshow. Try searching the Internet for “appraisal day” and “North Carolina,” for example, and you might find historical societies, senior centers, and realtors who are having appraisal events. There is usually a small fee to participate, but these events are frequently fundraisers for the organization that hosts them.

*Disclaimer: This list includes suggestions of organizations and resources that may be consulted. However, the Asheville Art Museum will not be held responsible for the quality of the services provided. This information is provided solely as a resource and is not an endorsement of any entity.