Story of the Madonna

Elliott Daingerfield

Elliott Daingerfield (03/26/1859-10/22/1932) was born in Harper's Ferry, Virginia.  He moved with his family in 1861 to Fayetteville, North Carolina. Daingerfield moved to New York City when he was 21 years old .He was a painter, printer, carpenter, illustrator, teacher, writer and lecturer.   Well known for his mystical, poetic, painting style, he grew to focus on the spirituality and symbolic value of painting.  He was influenced by Albert Pinkham Ryder and George Inness. Daingerfield was hired by the Santa Fe Railway Company to produce inspirational works depicting the far West.  This assignment resulted in a series of paintings on the Grand Canyon, yet Daingerfield always felt his artistic spiritualism was derived from the South, the subject for his truly symbolic works.  Prior to the commencement of a painting, he would reportedly pray to God 'to produce pictures which would inspire the highest good'. In 1884 Daingerfield moved to Holbein Studios and married Roberta Strange French, the daughter of a judge in Wilmington, North Carolina.  He moved to Blowing Rock, North Carolina, two years later to recuperate from a attack of diphtheria. In 1891 Daingerfield won the "point d'appui" in the Holbein Studios. His wife also died that year.  He remarried in 1895 and participated in various lectures and exhibitions.  Five years later he completed Winwood, his second home in Blowing Rock, NC. In 1907 Daingerfield completed a series of murals for the Lady Chapel of the Church of St. Mary the Virgin in New York City.  He also instructed a class in composition and oil painting at Philadelphia School of Design for Women. Daingerfield was elected to the Society of American Artists in April 1903 and  was elected to the National Academy of Design in 1906. In 1908 he moved from Holbein Studios to Gainsborough Studios, and two years later held his first public exhibition at Vose Galleries. Daingerfield and his family moved out west to Carmel, California in 1913.  In 1916, he built his third summer home, Westglow, in Blowing Rock.  That same year he began work on two more murals, and in 1918 he presented an altar picture to his church in Blowing Rock.  In 1924 Daingerfield toured Europe, but suffered a physical breakdown in November.  He died in 1932 at Gainsborough Studios of a heart attack. His art work is included in several important collections.  He was the author of publications commenting on George Inness, Albert Pinkham Ryder and Blakelock.

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